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    Minister for Housing and Public Works, Minister for Digital Technology and Minister for Sport
    The Honourable Mick de Brenni

    Clancy’s commitment overflows to Commonwealth Games

    Minister for Housing and Public Works, Minister for Digital Technology and Minister for Sport
    The Honourable Mick de Brenni

    Thursday, April 12, 2018

    Clancy’s commitment overflows to Commonwealth Games

    It’s a long way from land-locked Kingaroy to the soft sand of the Gold Coast but Australian beach volleyball’s golden girl, Taliqua Clancy, is poised to go for gold tonight at the Commonwealth Games.

    After starting her career on the indoor courts, Clancy, 25, was Australia’s first Indigenous beach volleyballer to compete at an Olympic Games when she took to the sand in Rio in 2016.

    After beating Vanuatu's Linline Matauatu and Miller Pata yesterday, she and her new competition partner, Peruvian-born Mariafe Artacho del Solar, will take on Canada tonight in a fight for the gold.

    Minister for Sport Mick de Brenni said 185cm Taliqua’s commitment to her sport reflects the Queensland spirit of pride, passion and perseverance.

    “Taliqua is an inspiration to so many beach volleyball fans and it is fantastic news that she will be representing Queensland on the international stage,” said Mr de Brenni.

    “She has been working towards this goal for many years and clearly her hard work and passion has paid off.

    “I’m sure I join with all Queenslanders in wishing Taliqua all the best for her final preparations for tonight – the whole country is behind you.”

    Five-time Olympian and multiple medal winner Natalie Cook said Taliqua is one of the world’s best, and that she was looking forward to seeing her compete.

    “Taliqua competes with flair, confidence, and spunk,” Ms Cook said.

    “I am looking forward to watching her in the green and gold!”

    Mr de Brenni acknowledged the support staff at the Queensland Academy of Sport, including the science, strength and health teams, which have worked tirelessly alongside Queensland’s home-grown athletes.

    “The years of behind-the-scenes work often goes unseen, but it’s what helps our athletes go that extra one percent and ensures they’re performing at their absolute best while representing the green and gold,” he said.

    [END]